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A few updates and a thank you

Folks, short post today due to Interbike. Wanted to give you a couple quick updates and a give you an idea of what the next week or two might look like. Read on for updates on the Clif Bar Team Chili Con Crosso's, Selma, the virtual road bike build, and a quick thank you to Chris King.

Clif Bar Team bikes are in the house. Just going through QC. Should be in stock later this week.

Selma - a few were raced this past weekend and reports are leaking out. For all you road fans, the Selma is a mtn bike. Sorry road bike lovers. Don't fret, we haven't forgotten you. I'll post up some road stuff after Interbike because I have a few good discussion topics to share.

Virtual Road Build - Parts are gathered. Wheels are built. Final build will happen today, tonight and possibly tomorrow. I had hoped to do a cool photoagraphy segment on this, but due to Interbike and timing, it just can't happen. However, I am taking this bike to Colorado later this week on my way to Interbike and I hope to ride in the mountains a bit. Look for some photo's. Until then, here are few component shots.

I'd really like to send a shout out to Chris King Components. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. CK watched the virtual road bike build happening and offered up headset and hubs for the build. I figured since they were offering to help with the build, I'd ask for something special like the 3 color headset and matching pewter road hubs. Its so nice working with folks like this. It's even nicer knowing I'll likely never have to work on the headset or hubs again. They are perfect choices for the virtual road build. I also admire King Components for their commitment to the environment. They are a smaller company leading and pushing a bigger industry. Thank you.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Jason Boucher

Growing up as a Minnesota farm boy, I developed an appreciation and love for land and open space. This appreciation has fostered two passions, cycling and photography. Both of these passions provide freedom, encourage me to explore and foster creativity. More importantly though, my journey with a bike and a camera reminds me that the world is big and I am small.

COMMENTS (35)

 Anonymous |

Yeah…..right!

 Anonymous |

TIME TO SHOW US SELMA ALREADY!

 Anonymous |

It’s Sneak Peak Friday.  Where’s Selma?

 Anonymous |

Do you have a login and password for Q’s site you can share with us so we can take a look as well?  Thanks!

 Anonymous |

It?s fantastic that they engineer such nice steel frames with a pleasant price tag. Not many labels do so these days. I will order a pistola as soon as it arrives in my shop. Then, I will transfer my La Raza into a winter trainer with fenders, and use the Dura Ace gear on the Pistola.

 Anonymous |

New salsa offerings on Q’s website!! Completes, frames (new colors)....woohooo!!!!

 Anonymous |

I have heard that LA is planning a comeback into racing and TdF 2009. Then he need a bike, I guess that podia is god enough, if the weigh can be reduced to 15 lbs. But he also need a tempo bike. That?s a problem.

 Anonymous |

Yeah! I betcha if LA rode a Podio you wouldn’t hear any complaints.

 Anonymous |

No one wants Salsa to become a mainstream roadie brand.  Those who think so, like the two posts above this one, haven’t read carefully the posts above.  No one wants a celebrity riding a Salsa, nor a Salsa to win one of the major pro road races (Giro, Tour, etc).<BR><BR>To the person who though Salsa had never, or should never do a track bike, check out this rare Salsa track bike: http://urbanvelo.org/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/l_9296f7b589a44ff10fb155eadc9e7a63.jpg<BR><BR>There are many more things Salsa can do with road, other than just a carbon race frame (which I imagine will inevitably arrive in a couple of years).  Salsa demonstrated this when they did the Casseroll.  There were tons of production singlespeeds in the market when the Casseroll was launched, but none with the versatility of the Casseroll.  Now the Casseroll has spawned several imitators.<BR><BR>I’m thankful to Salsa for the road offerings they’ve done to date, which are awesome, and I enjoy riding my road Salsa’s and having people ask me about them—many of whom have never seen a Salsa before in their life.  But most of all, I enjoy riding them because they’re so well thought out.  That’s what truly counts at the end of the ride.

 Anonymous |

I imagine the thing people really want is a BIG name to place on a Salsa road bike in a major race so they can feel the vicarious love and affirmation.

 Guitar Ted |

Well, while Jason may have checked out, I still have to comment here as well. <BR><BR>Roadie guys are wanting more. Okay…...more what? <BR><BR>Ya got a steel bike, actually two. You have a new aluminum/Scandium rig. An actual race bike. Okay, Jason almost all but said you will have a carbon race rig soon. <BR><BR>Ummm…hang several different gruppos off the same frame and you have tons of options, which is what most companies are doing. Salsa isn’t going to do that, can’t do that.  So what are the holes? What is missing? (Besides the obvious carbon bike)<BR><BR>A time trial bike maybe? <BR><BR>I just am curious.

 Anonymous |

I’d like to have it all… but I respect Salsa’s work in crafting quality frames and offering them at reasonable price points. From what I have seen, Salsa does a fantastic job with getting the most of a bike’s geometry to deliver the goods. <BR>I ride with a bunch bunch of Colnagos, Pinarellos, Cinellis and other Italian fare, and my Salsa stands out like a sore thumb. I like that. It performs just as nice and my bike is actually far more versatile than most of the other bikes in my group. They just scratch their heads as I fly on by. <BR>It would be nice for Salsa to be acknowledged by the roadies as a viable road racer company, but that will take time and those who enjoy a little pepper power are testament to the fine work being done at Salsa. <BR><BR>Keep it up!

 Butcher |

Folks, let’s table this until after Interbike.  I’m checking out and heading to Colorado tomorrow so I won’t be here to moderate.  <BR><BR>Here’s my take.  <BR><BR>People want more from Salsa.  <BR><BR>That’s a good thing….And at times that can be bit daunting.  <BR><BR>Let’s be respectful of others wishes and desires for Salsa bikes.  This forum is here to interact and tell us what you want.  <BR><BR>That is what I’d like to explore when we get back from Interbike.  <BR><BR>I’m out of here and will be back in September 30th.  <BR><BR>Don’t worry, we’ve got some stuff planned between now and then.  <BR><BR>Stay tuned.

 Anonymous |

“Yes, Jason, us Salsa roadies need to have a serious discussion with you after Interbike :(”<BR><BR>Excuse me?  <BR><BR>Salsa just introduced TWO road bikes; the Podio and the Pistola.  Both awesome roadbikes as far as I can tell.<BR><BR>I don’t understand why you guys are giving Salsa so much grief.

 Anonymous |

“This is completely off subject, but I would love a 29 tooth 94BCD chainring. The only two I can find are 130 and 300 bones. I know Salsa already makes a 30 tooth…”<BR><BR>AGREED!  Please, please, please make this happen.  Silver or black, I don’t care.

 Anonymous |

MMullins—Please be civil.  Using words like “ranting” might get your comment deleted by Salsa, as it might be perceived by some of us as offensive. <BR><BR>If a full carbon fiber racing frameset doesn’t fit the Salsa brand in your mind, that’s because it’s only your mind.  It’s not other people’s mind.  My mind is big enough to fit this and more when it comes to the Salsa brand.<BR><BR>Salsa started out as an mtb brand, but Salsa is no longer owned by the people who founded it.  It also doesn’t mean Salsa needs to remain a strictly mtb shop.  In fact, the La Raza is a road model that predates Salsa was purchased by QBP.  Jason and his crew have very successfully expanded the Salsa brand into other areas.  Their vision has gone beyond what Salsa’s original vision, and that’s all for the better.  <BR><BR>The number between off-road and road frames doesn’t need to be equal.  All people are saying is road offerings should be increased from current levels, and that includes more than just frames.<BR><BR>As to what new niches Salsa can go into, or even create, when it comes to road I’ll leave that to Salsa as they seem to be doing an excellent job coming up with new ideas.

 mMullins |

I second the plea for a carbon fiber version of the shaft; I’ve been wanting that for quite awhile. And since a new Ti stem is being offered it just makes sense to match it with a Ti seatpost, too.<BR><BR>I am a bit confused by all the ranting by the roadies. Other than a full carbon fiber racing frameset, which doesn’t really fit with the Salsa brand in my mind, I don’t see other niche areas that Salsa isn’t filling with their upcoming road lineup for 2009. The Casseroll fulfills three areas with the single speed commuter, casual road rides and touring, while the Pistola looks to be an awesome all-around steel road frame, and the Podio a lightweight more racing inspired breed. Maybe a track bike, but that has never been a Salsa niche. Salsa was first and foremost a mountain bike brand from its inception, so I don’t see why people think the number of frames between road and mountain has to be equal. What am I missing here?<BR><BR>Care to elaborate for those of us that are mostly mountain bikers. Enlightenment obviously is needed…

 Anonymous |

When the Chinese Schwinn brand does a bike called the ‘Cutter’, and most mass market brands are churning out randonneurs, you know the retro thing has been milked to death.  It’s time to be contrarian.  When others are going back, you must go forward.

 Anonymous |

Selma, please show your face already and stop playing so hard to get!

 Anonymous |

A Salsa Ti or carbon bottle cage might not be as complex or expensive to execute as carbon frames/bikes, and it sends a signal—especially to Roadie World—that Salsa is looking ahead, not back, and that even better and greater things will come from Salsa in the near future.<BR><BR>A carbon or Ti Shaft may also make sense, for the same reasons as above.<BR><BR>I second the opinions that have appeared on this blog before concerning the Podio’s wheels.  I too think Podio absolutely needs(especially given Podio’s ambitious msrp) Ksyrium Equipe instead of Aksium.  I’m sure I’m not alone.

 Butcher |

Anonymous - Thank you.  We hear you.  We’ll be showing a new stem next week at Interbike.  I know it’s only one produdt, but its a start and will look killer on a Podio.  <BR><BR>Thanks

 Anonymous |

Jason, your concern with doing carbon right is important, and you're going about it the right way.  <BR><BR>It's also good Salsa has expanded its complete road offerings.<BR><BR>However, there's still a major imbalance when it comes to your off-road vs. on-road offerings.<BR><BR>Increasing your road offerings (which is not only frames, but also parts and accessories) does not require Salsa to be in the Tour, nor that Salsa position itself as a 'high end road racing brand'.<BR><BR>After all, Salsa is also not a high end mtb racing brand.  Salsa has done well in the off-road segment by making well-designed, reasonably priced bikes that may be certainly be raced (and are), but there are no carbon cross or mtb race Salsa frames/bikes.  Carbon is not the future, it's the present.<BR><BR>If Salsa wants to focus its resources on off-road racing, sponsorships and products, that's all good.  But it will slowly and surely loose road customers.  <BR><BR>Not all of us roadies want cookie-cutter big company road stuff.  We look to Salsa (as well as to a few others) as an alternative.  Not all of us roadies care about doped-up pro road racing, though we still may enjoy racing ourselves, or at least riding really, really fast.  <BR><BR>When Salsa is ready for road carbon (I estimate this will be within the next 3 years) , we'll be there.  In the meantime, we'd like to see a bit more road product and a bit more road support.  There's a ton of road races (crits, sportifs, etc) that it would be cool for Salsa to sponsor, and that are not mainstreatm, hyped up, super expensive events such as the Giro or the Vuelta.  <BR><BR>A last word: I'm really enjoying riding my Casseroll Single, and I can't wait for the Podio to be available so I can be the first customer to place an order.  <BR><BR>Race & Smile.

 Anonymous |

This is completely off subject, but I would love a 29 tooth 94BCD chainring. The only two I can find are 130 and 300 bones. I know Salsa already makes a 30 tooth…

 Butcher |

<span class=“deleted-comment”>This post has been removed by the author.</span>

 Butcher |

We will be discussing some of this later on the blog, but I must chime in here.  I just can't read this and not comment.  <BR><BR>The truth is, we have 2 new amazing road bikes this year to go along with our highly successful, functional, unique, & beautiful Salsa Casseroll.  Considerig the Casseroll is offered in two specifications, that's 4 road bikes for 2009.  Not bad for a small brand…At least in my opinion.  I'm sure someone will point out that 4 isn't even half of our total offerings.  Heck, it's only about 20%.<BR><BR>Would we like more?  It depends.  We'd like more if we had the resources to do it all and do it right. Frankly, we don't.  We are still small…but with bigger dreams <BR><BR>On top of that, we need to keep in mind that projects need to fit the Salsa brand.  Where on this site do you see that Salsa is a high end road racing brand?  I don't think you'll see that.  Can our bikes be raced?  Of course.  Is our focus the tour like most every other high end production based high end road company?  Nope.  Do we want a cheap carbon bike for the sake of offering carbon?  Nope.  I don't think that is what you readers want either.  <BR><BR>We do understand that some folks want a carbon road bike from us. Thank you.  We hear you.  We also understand that we will need carbon in our line up to reach for our vision and for the future success of Salsa. <BR><BR>Regarding carbon, we don't want to take an off the shelf mold with limited options, choices that aren't ours, and geometry we don't like.  We'll leave that to the other 100, or 1000, vendors buying carbon and putting a paint job on it.<BR><BR>For a company the size of Salsa, moving into carbon has two options.  <BR><BR>1)  Commit and risk everything.  Put all our other projects on hold.  Forget updating and developing the products and people that got us to where we are at today.  <BR><BR>2)  Commit.  Plan.  Execute.  Build not only our core producst, but move into new materials and directions carefully and strategically.  Do what it takes to do it right and let the timing be whenever it is ready.<BR><BR>I think it's pretty easy to read this and figure out where we are going.  <BR><BR>We want to do it right.  We'll release the stuff when it's ready.  I suspect when we do, it will be very, very good.  It will be in categories we not only like, but also in categories we will most likely have success.  We won't be able to meet everyone's needs.  Some will be happy.  Some will be unhappy.  It isn't and won't happen fast enough for some.  For others, it will likely be too fast.  Carbon is in our future.  That is how it is. <BR><BR>All that said, I'm super stoked that folks want more from us.  That is the best part of this discussion.  These discussions get me fired up and tell me there is opportunity.  <BR><BR>Anyway, sorry for the mini rant.  Look for more on this after Interbike.  It's a good discussion.

 Anonymous |

There's a lot that can be done with road bikes.  Salsa is not coming out with stuff for all riders.  It's coming out with stuff mainly for off-road riders, and a bit for on-road riders.  If Salsa wants to position itself in the market place as 'more than just an mtb brand', it needs to put its money and its r&d where its mouth is, and bring balance to its offerings.  Sorry, but that's just the plain truth.

 Joel |

How about we just say it’s a carbon dos with an EBB :-)<BR><BR>Jason, you are killing us here!

 Spinner |

I’ll have to agree with biggs that Salsa is doing well with it’s frame and complete bike offerings.  Besides, there is so much more you can do with a fat tire bike and even a cross bike than a road bike.  I don’t mean to offend, but I like that they are coming out with cool stuff for all riders rather than just super high end roadie stuff.<BR><BR>Build Trails or Die ;)

 mMullins |

I heard a rumor that this Selma is basically the much anticipated Mamasita single speed with an EBB…sounds too good to be true. I still am loving my Juan Solo, if only it could accept a 650B rear wheel it would be perfect ;).

 Anonymous |

How you design a carbon bike is way different than a steel one.  Don’t discount how challenging it is, so many more variables with less concrete material properties and more manufacturing considerations.

 Anonymous |

May we please have a post introducing Selma tomorrow, with pics?

 Cyclists for a Better Society |

Everyone likes a well made bike.  That goes without saying.  Carbon or steel is only of secondary importance.<BR><BR>No one is arguing Salsa should make “Post-it Notes” frames.  They are, however, suggesting Salsa balance their offerings, which are currently VERY heavily skewed towards non-pavement.<BR><BR>“The Force must be brought back into balance”—Yoda

 Smitty |

Hey, how about a shout out to Jeff Hall?  I didn’t even glimpse him, I was way too far in the back, but the reports say he piloted a Salsa to 2nd place in the Chequamegon 40 this weekend, after leading much of the race on a solo break.  Was he aboard a Selma?<BR><BR>Have fun at Interbike.  Stay out of trouble, Amigos.<BR><BR>P.S. - I liked Biggs comment about a carbon road frame…good sentiment.

 Biggs |

I for one think Salsa has done a great job this past year in the diversity of the offerings.  By my count (which could be wrong) two road, three mountain (including the SELMA), and a swweeettt adventure bike were introduced.  Salsa isn’t a giant bike company, so to expect them to crank out new frames out of multiple types of materials like packets of Post-it notes is not fair.<BR><BR>Getting a carbon road bike out isn’t as important as creating a carbon road bike that works well and makes you want quit your job and give racing a real shot.<BR><BR>For me there is something about Salsa bikes that makes me want to ride more… keep up the good work!

 Anonymous |

Yes, Jason, us Salsa roadies need to have a serious discussion with you after Interbike :(

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